Crowns

A crown (or cap) is a covering that encases the entire tooth surface restoring it to its original shape and size.  A crown protects and strengthens tooth structure that cannot be restored with fillings or other types of restorations.

Although there are several types of crowns, porcelain (tooth colored crown) are the most popular, because they resemble your natural teeth.  They are highly durable and will last many years, but like most dental restorations, they may eventually need to be replaced.  Porcelain crowns are made to match the shape, size, and color or your teeth giving you a natural, long-lasting beautiful smile.

Reasons for crowns:

  • Broken or fractured teeth.

  • Cosmetic enhancement.

  • Decayed teeth.

  • Fractured fillings.

  • Large fillings.

  • Tooth has a root canal.

Implants

Dental implants allow patients to regain fully functional and natural appearing smiles. Tooth loss is caused by tooth decay, gum disease, or trauma. Dental implants are an alternative to ordinary dental bridges or dentures to fill in the gaps caused by missing teeth.

 

A tooth implant is a durable titanium cylinder that is surgically placed into the upper or lower jawbone. After placement, the implant will fuse with the jawbone until it is fully integrated and becomes part of your body. Dental implants can be restored with dental crowns, dentures, or dental bridges.

 

Dental implants work just like real teeth with real roots! They stimulate the jawbone to prevent it from weakening and collapsing. Each tooth implant can sustain all of the bite force and ability of a natural tooth.

 

If you want to replace one or more missing teeth, ask us about implant dentistry.

Dental implants are reliable enough to support bridges, dentures, or crowns.

Root Canal Treatment

A root canal is needed when damage occurs to a tooth’s pulp. This can happen due to injury or due to severe tooth decay. A root canal is often a dreaded procedure but this can be an alternative to a tooth extraction and can be a very effective way to eliminate tooth pain.

A root canal is performed to clean out the infected tooth pulp, and disinfect the canals of the tooth. The only other treatment would be to extract the tooth. Once the infection is resolved, the canal(s) are filled in to prevent any further infection. Usually a core build-up and crown is recommended for restoring a tooth that has had root canal therapy.

Dentures and Partial Dentures

A denture is a removable dental appliance replacement for missing teeth and surrounding tissue. They are made to closely resemble your natural teeth and may even enhance your smile. The reasons for a partial or denture are that you may have lost some or all or your teeth, enhance your smile and facial tissues, or improve your chewing speech, and digestion.

 

There are two types of dentures - complete and partial dentures.  Complete dentures are used when all of the teeth are missing, while partial dentures are used when some natural teeth remain.  A Partial denture not only fills in the spaces created by missing teeth, it prevents other teeth from shifting.

Bridges

Missing teeth make it difficult to chew without pain or smile without embarrassment. If missing teeth are not promptly treated, they can cause your remaining teeth to shift and become crooked.
 

Dental bridges have been used for years to replace missing teeth. There are several types of bridges.  You and your Dentist will discuss the best options for your particular case.  The “traditional bridge” is the most popular type and is usually made of porcelain fused to metal.  Porcelain fixed bridges are most popular because they resemble your natural teeth.  This type of bridge consists to two crowns that go over two anchoring teeth (abutment teeth) and are attached to pontics (artificial teeth), filling the gap created by one or more missing teeth.

 

TMJ Treatment

TMJ stands for temporal-mandibular joint. Temporal, as in temple area of skull; mandibular as in mandible, or lower jaw; joint as in it's where the head and jaw meet. Problems in this joint may be caused by a misalignment of the teeth, trauma, or excess muscle tension. Aside from the two bones that meet there, cartilage buffers them and five muscles are involved in the area. If something goes wrong a good deal of trouble can result.

Problems in this area can cause:

  • Headaches

  • Earaches

  • Trouble/soreness in opening and closing the mouth

  • Clicking or popping of the jaw

  • Pain in the jaw muscles

  • Soreness in the area, sometimes extending to the face